Tag Archives: sustainability

Dr. Martin Luther King

My theme for this week is inherent bias – that voice within, that if left unchallenged, will serve only to defend our current belief system, and given that its Martin Luther King Day, there’s no better time than now to listen to an audio reading of a letter he wrote while being held in Birmingham jail. Many of the points raised in this letter are timeless and can help all of us to challenge our inherent bias.

The voice within, which will bring you into linearity with the progressing connection culture, is the voice of understanding.

This understanding arises when opinion is held off, for just a little while longer.

If holding off on judgement is not something you are interested in doing for moral advancement, then do it for professionalism.

A professional does not engage. I professional collects data and takes action that is most effective in accomplishing the means desired. The professional sees no advantage in venting the byproducts of emotional response, unless it’s seen fit.

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Speaking while female

While reading a New York Times article on why women often stay more quite at work, I was reminded about a construct which exists in all of us.

Inherent bias: It’s the reason more black officers are shot by other officers while undercover than white officers. It’s the reason women’s opinions and observation are often less heard and valued than men.

Oppression of others does not have to be overt.

One of the solutions is mindfulness. Without meditation and mindfulness we have a high risk of falling into reaction and of never fully turning the gaze of our awareness onto our own reality.

It takes a calm mind, which has the ability to sit through emotional fluctuations, to see truth in a situation.

In life, those who observe longest without falling into opinion acquire the most understanding.

The second we attain an opinion our judgement is immediately biased. Especially if we are sure that we have come to the correct conclusion.

Hold off just a little bit longer – just as a matter of professionalism. See what you might hear.

Inherent bias is the enemy. It clouds our vision. It takes our edge. Our emotions can become strings, which allow us to be played like an instrument by those who know the chords.

Seek truth or allow yourself to be the defender of someone else’s story.

That’s the true rebellion .

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/11/opinion/sunday/speaking-while-female.html?_r=0

About Wanderingupward

Hello, I’m Matt Hunter. Thank you much for visiting my site. Wanderingupward is my way of sharing projects, knowledge, ideas, writings, and anything else I think may be of value to others.

I live on a 5 acre piece of land in Osceola County, with my mom and our three dogs, which my family has owned since the early 80’s. It’s a great privilege and joy to be able to steward this beautiful piece of property. This is where many of my projects that I share come from.

I work for the City of St. Cloud as Coordinator of their Urban Agriculture Program where I oversee the community gardens, teach gardening and permaculture classes, organize different initiatives, and advise some local growers. I’m also working with Osceola County Grown on the development of a farm and CSA in which we are following the practices of Jean Martin Fortier to create a small-scale, no-till, organic farm.

Another thing you may see on this site are some of my projects with the Orlando Permaculture Group. I started this group in 2014 after returning from my bicycle trip to visit homesteads and sustainability projects. I’ve moved on from being a core organizer of the group, but I still regularly help the amazing new leadership team with different projects.

I don’t make any money from this site and rarely research and publish articles for their own sake. My main purpose for the blog is to have a platform and stay in the habit of documenting my work. I’ve found this to be quite gratifying and even useful over the years.

I try to keep posts educational and demonstrational but sometimes feel the need to rant, write essays, or share (mostly unimpressive) poetry. I recommend taking the opinion posts with a grain of salt. If I wrote them over a week ago chances are I don’t even agree with them anymore.

Feel free to browse through the drop-down menus to see what kind of topics I’ve written about. Also feel free to comment or ask questions about anything you see on here. You can also email me at wanderinupward@gmail.com

 

 

Guwahi Ecovillage

Five and a half weeks into my trip and I’ve ended up at Tranquility Campgrounds in Mentone Alabama for an opportunity to get some experience with design and implementation of food forest and zone two garden systems. The location I’m working at is the homestead of Ruth Thompson, and hopeful future site of Guwahi Ecovillage, which is being designed and implemented by her son Marcus Thompson. Take a tour around the grounds and meet a few of the people that are staying here now.

Planting asparagus crowns

Many people don’t know this, but asparagus is a perennial plant which can live for 15 to 20 years, and from seed takes three years before it is fully productive. As you will see in the video though, through purchase and planting of asparagus “crowns” your plant can be productive within one or two years of planting. Watch the video for a detailed overview of preparation and planting of asparagus crowns.

Travel Journal – Day 32

So it’s day 32 of my trip and I have parted ways with my wonderful hosts, Wendi, Jayden, and Kaia Bellows,

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and headed toward the off-grid homestead of Mycol Stevens, located 30 miles or so North in Brooker Florida. Mycol wasn’t there when I arrived, but I was greeted by Brian and Genina two of the most humble and natural people I could hope to encounter, and theyfit so naturally into the farm that I could hardly now imagine it without them, and luckily I didn’t have to.

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So, I settled in, set up tent and got the tour. Finca Mycol is a 20 acre off-grid homestead, which serves as a permaculture experimentation laboratory, and, thanks to the efforts of Mycol, a native restoration land and keystone species habitat.

So once again, despite my efforts to move on and find my way out of Florida, I have found myself pulled to stay and learn. Both Mycol and Brian are inspiring sources of knowledge and passion on all things plants, so wow, what a great place to hang out, gain knowledge, build relationships, and be of service. There is one drawback though from being off-grid and so far out in the country – there’s no internet connection. So, any videos I take will have to be put up later, and pictures and other blog posts and communication have to wait until I can catch a ride into town. But hey look at the perks:

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a beautiful outdoor kitchen,

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fresh greens from the garden in a coconut bowl,

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fresh cooked snake (don’t worry, we didn’t kill him. He got run over on the road 😦 Poor little guy),

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a beautiful pond and great company,

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and another pond, and more great company,

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and more great company,

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and artists making art.

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Simple living and high thinking. Awareness. Consciousness. Intentionality. Choice. Walking toward what’s right. Nevermind the odds.